fodder

fod·der (fŏd’ər)
n.
  1. Feed for livestock
  2. Raw material, as for artistic creation.
  3. A consumable item or resource that is in demand and usually abundant supply

 

 

ORIGIN Old English fodor, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch voeder and German Futter, also to FOOD

 

 

Dictionary.com.

 

 

tether = my own work + more words

 

(Source: desert-dreamer, via dikua)

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

growhousegrow:

Pattern!  Color!

Poster design by Ferdinand Andri and Albert Berger for the 26th exhibition of the Vienna Secession in 1906 (Source)

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

growhousegrow:

Pattern!  Color!

Poster design by Ferdinand Andri and Albert Berger for the 26th exhibition of the Vienna Secession in 1906 (Source)

unconsumption:

Spending More Won’t Make You Happy … 
Over on TIME.com, Martha C. White writes:

Our piles of crap don’t just contribute to reality-TV shows like Storage Wars and Hoarders — they also make us miserable, and not just when we can’t find the right remote or trip over a plastic robot our kid left on the floor.
Getting things like a new car or 60-inch flat-screen are goals many of us work toward. Unfortunately, these pursuits have the opposite effect we intend: Instead of making us happier, getting more stuff drags us down. In a new paper published in the journal Motivation and Emotion, Knox College psychology professor Tim Kasser shows, through a series of experiments spanning from six months to 12 years, that when people become more materialistic, their emotional well-being takes a dive. 
…
“My sense is that over the course of human history there have been many ways to demonstrate that one is a successful person… our social economic system channelizes that so the way to demonstrate it is to show you’re wealthy,” he says. “The scorecard for success is about money.” In our consumer-driven culture, the system itself depends on people telling themselves they need those truck tires or that pair of shoes or whatever else Madison Avenue convinces us we need.
The connection between our stuff and our self-esteem is a two-way street: If we become less materialistic, our well-being will improve. If our well-being improves, we tend to be less materialistic.

Kasser’s work indicates it’s possible to change our outlook and boost well-being by reducing the importance of material goods and materialistic goals in our lives. 
More: Spending More Won’t Make You Happy - TIME

unconsumption:

Spending More Won’t Make You Happy … 

Over on TIME.com, Martha C. White writes:

Our piles of crap don’t just contribute to reality-TV shows like Storage Wars and Hoarders — they also make us miserable, and not just when we can’t find the right remote or trip over a plastic robot our kid left on the floor.

Getting things like a new car or 60-inch flat-screen are goals many of us work toward. Unfortunately, these pursuits have the opposite effect we intend: Instead of making us happier, getting more stuff drags us down. In a new paper published in the journal Motivation and Emotion, Knox College psychology professor Tim Kasser shows, through a series of experiments spanning from six months to 12 years, that when people become more materialistic, their emotional well-being takes a dive. 

“My sense is that over the course of human history there have been many ways to demonstrate that one is a successful person… our social economic system channelizes that so the way to demonstrate it is to show you’re wealthy,” he says. “The scorecard for success is about money.” In our consumer-driven culture, the system itself depends on people telling themselves they need those truck tires or that pair of shoes or whatever else Madison Avenue convinces us we need.

The connection between our stuff and our self-esteem is a two-way street: If we become less materialistic, our well-being will improve. If our well-being improves, we tend to be less materialistic.

Kasser’s work indicates it’s possible to change our outlook and boost well-being by reducing the importance of material goods and materialistic goals in our lives.

More: Spending More Won’t Make You Happy - TIME

skeletorislove:

Skeletor Affirmations (by ghoulnextdoor)
TODAY I WON’T LET THEM PUSH MY BUTTONS.

skeletorislove:

Skeletor Affirmations (by ghoulnextdoor)

TODAY I WON’T LET THEM PUSH MY BUTTONS.

doctorwho:

bbcamerica:

Based on science and embellished by fantasy…

The Real History of Science Fiction premieres Saturday, April 19 at 10/9c— Immediately following the Premiere of the New Season of Orphan Black at 9/8c, only on BBC America.

BBC America delves into the real history of science fiction with filmmakers, writers, actors and graphic artists looking back on their experiences and on how their obsession and imagination has taken them into the unknown. 

Narrated by Mark Gatiss, and featuring new, exclusive interviews with David Tennant, Nathan Fillion, Zoe Saldana, William Shatner and more.

Up first: ROBOTS: What if our creations turn against us?  The idea of creating life has fascinated society since the earliest days of science fiction. The first installment of the four-part series transports viewers from the first steps of Frankenstein’s monster to the threat provided by the Terminator and the world of Cyberspace.

Give this trailer the signal boost of all signal boosts!

(Source: benweaver)

eriebasin:

1902 Postcard from Vesuvius (sold)

eriebasin:

1902 Postcard from Vesuvius (sold)