fodder

fod·der (fŏd’ər)
n.
  1. Feed for livestock
  2. Raw material, as for artistic creation.
  3. A consumable item or resource that is in demand and usually abundant supply

 

 

ORIGIN Old English fodor, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch voeder and German Futter, also to FOOD

 

 

Dictionary.com.

 

 

tether = my own work + more words

 

theothergreenline:

An example of what would have adorned the walls of homes in the 1890’s, around when the first electric street car ran along University Ave. Called Apothecary’s Garden, the designer created simple shapes from what he observed in the garden.

theothergreenline:

An example of what would have adorned the walls of homes in the 1890’s, around when the first electric street car ran along University Ave. Called Apothecary’s Garden, the designer created simple shapes from what he observed in the garden.

(Source: smeadows)

huldrapress:

Sasanian Earring, ca 3rd- 6th century AD.

huldrapress:

Sasanian Earring, ca 3rd- 6th century AD.

A child asked about a swirl of dead leaves, ‘Do they like dancing?’ Jean Piaget, The Psychology of the Child, 1962 (via cataloginganimism)

(via jewelsallaround)

smeadows:

A Man with a Pansy and a Skull about 1535, Follower of Jan van Scorel

smeadows:

A Man with a Pansy and a Skull
about 1535, Follower of Jan van Scorel

pr1nceshawn:

AT-AT made out of reclaimed skateboards by Derek Keenan

(Source: superpunch.net, via unconsumption)